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Charles Lindbergh & Juan Trippe

Charles Lindbergh served at the technical advisor for 45 years and played a huge role in determining Transatlantic routes.


A Letter From Lindbergh To Trippe: 
September 15, 1933,  Handwritten Report

"In establishing a transatlantic air route it is fully as important to decide which route will be most advantageous in the future as it is to decide which is the best to operate over today… It has always been my belief that with every advance in aviation the air route will tend to follow more closely the great circle course between the localities they serve. I believe that in the future aircraft will detour bad weather areas by flying above them rather than around them."

Lindbergh elaborates further on potential air routes and also reports on airplane and communication equipment needs.

"Planes used on a northern transatlantic route must have reliability plenty of range and high speed. It is essential to eliminate the possibility of forced landings due to engine failure. A great deal of flying would have to be done over low fog covering rough ice and probably over storm areas… I believe that a northern transatlantic regular service should not be contemplated with planes which are not capable of flying nonstop from the western side of the Greenland ice cap to Iceland if necessary… It is not possible for me to overemphasize the necessity of a sufficient number of radio stations on a northern route to give reliable weather information and to give bearings.


Information from University of Miami, Richter Library

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